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Frankie Newton, Dave Frishberg, Thelonious Monk, Anat Cohen, Ryan Keberle, Ran Blake!
Details in Notes from the Editor
New in Historical Essays:
FRANKIE NEWTON:
THE FORGOTTEN TRUMPETER
(Part 1)

Despite appearing on some of the greatest jazz records of the 1930s,  and possessing one of the most personal sounds in jazz history, trumpeter Frankie Newton is barely remembered today. His biography is filled with contradictory information, and his discography has several mysterious gaps. Thomas Cunniffe sorts out the conflicting details and discusses all of Newton's recordings in this special 2-part Historical Essay.

New in Retro Reviews:

DISCOVERIES!
The modern-day discoveries of unreleased recordings keep jazz history an ongoing endeavor.  Historians like Loren Schoenberg (of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem) and Zev Feldman (of Resonance Records and other independent companies) have discovered unissued recordings that have changed our perspective on the artists. This month, Thomas Cunniffe reviews the third volume of the Bill Savory Collection and Thelonious Monk's film score for "Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960".

Book Reviews:
"CONVERSATIONS WITH CHARLIE HADEN" (by Josef Woodard & Charlie Haden)
Charlie Haden was known for passionate music that encompassed several genres, and his fiery left-wing politics. Over the last two decades of his life, Haden was interviewed several times by writer Josef Woodard. Seventeen of these encounters have been collected in a new book, "Conversations with Charlie Haden". Reviewer Thomas Cunniffe writes that the book is quite enlightening, but gets bogged down with numerous retellings of Haden's life story.  

Profiles:
LUCIANA SOUZA:
PASSION AND VERSATILITY
Few contemporary vocalists have the stylistic range of Luciana Souza. She is a remarkable improviser and composer who can not only offer passionate interpretations of songs from America and Brazil, but is also a collaborator with contemporary classical composer Osvaldo Golijov. Thomas Cunniffe introduces you to Souza in this JHO profile, which includes audio and video clips of Souza at work


New in Sidetracks:
THE DAVE FRISHBERG SONGBOOK
When someone says "they don't write good songs anymore", they must not referring to Dave Frishberg. Since the early Sixties, Frishberg has created witty, off-beat songs which have the repertoire of many singers. Thomas Cunniffe offers his own salute to this superb musician with a selection of Frishberg's best songs, some performed by the composer himself. 






THE QUIET REVOLUTION
There’s a lot of screaming happening in our world right now, but sometimes, a whisper can be as effective as a scream. The two albums of protest jazz reviewed here generally make their points without raising dynamics. Thomas Cunniffe examines new recordings by Dominque Eade/Ran Blake and Ryan Keberle's Catharsis. 




New in CD Reviews:
ANAT COHEN ABRAÇA O BRASIL (ANAT COHEN EMBRACES BRAZIL)
In addition to being one of the best jazz clarinetists today, Anat Cohen is a particularly fine interpreter of Brazilian music. She has made several trips to Brazil over the past two decades, and one of her collaborators says that she plays Brazilian music "with a perfect accent". Thomas Cunniffe reviews two new CDs of Brazilian music, which represents her greatest concentration to this unique musical heritage. 


TRIBUTES & COLLABORATIONS
Many current jazz albums are either collaborations or tributes, but the four vocal CDs reviewed this month fall into both categories. Judy Niemack and Dan Tepfer's duet disc, "Listening to You" salutes Lee Konitz, while a bevy of top-name singers take part in "The Passion of Charlie Parker". The New York band Swingadelic offers a sampler of Johnny Mercer songs, and Mark Winkler remembers his late husband on "The Company I Keep". Thomas Cunniffe offers his thoughts on these recordings. 



Concert Reviews:
BRANFORD MARSALIS & KURT ELLING AT THE DU NEWMAN CENTER
(May 13, 2017)

On May 13, 2017, Denver jazz fans had the choice to hear several top-rank artists in live performances across the city. JHO's Thomas Cunniffe joined about 1000 audience members at the University of Denver's Newman Center for a concert by the Branford Marsalis Quartet with guest Kurt Elling. Cunniffe reports that the entire group was in top form, excelling their performances on their recent CD, "Upward Spiral".
 
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